About my garden

Monday, 9 October 2017

Orange Allouise In a Vase on Monday.

Sunday here was a beautiful day left over from summer. I was able to spend several happy hours outside weeding some places which have been neglected and moving plants around. 
We have been here for two years now and have learnt how the different areas work. Some are in full sun, which is easy but there are several places which get a good bit of shade so have to be treated differently. 
Did I leave the garden for a year as you are supposed to do, to learn all about it? Don't be daft, of course I didn't, does anyone do that? I was planting in the first few weeks and made plenty of mistakes but, look on the bright side, most things are happy and growing well. Some are growing too well and that is why they have to move. 
Late summer is a great time to move things but I feel it's like one of those puzzles where you move around the little squares to make a picture. You just move that one down there and another one over there but then this one is wrong so you move it up a bit. That is me and my plants. I am always left with a large clump of something mouldering in a bucket or wheelbarrow or left on the grass till it goes yellow underneath and I'm in trouble. Today it's a large clump of Iris sibirica. I'm not sure where it's going but I didn't leave it on the grass. 
I still have lots to cut to put in a vase. This is Chrysanthemum 'Orange Allouise'


I'd meant to wander round the garden and look for things to go with Allouise in her vase. There was no time so she went in on her own but, as is often the way, I think she looks better flying solo and we can see all the curvy petals. 
The vase is rather an odd one. Silver on the inside and raised black, raised, velvety pattern on the outside. 


I bought rooted Chrysanthemum cuttings this spring and they have made tall strong plants but this is the first one to flower. Does anyone know what sort of conditions they need? I must have something wrong. 

I've also made a posy. I did go round with the roses choosing what to add in. This is 'Aphrodite' and she has beautifully shaped buds but the rain is really spoiling the blooms so I've brought some inside. 
 I found red basil flowers (which are purple), pinapple sage flowers (bright red), Abelia, Pittosporum, convulvulus cneorum. 

The Abelia flowers have gone over really but I like the pinky brachts, or whatever they are called, and often put them in vases. 

For all sorts of amazing and adorable vases visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden and see what she has In a Vase on Monday. 

25 comments:

  1. What a fine Chrysanthemum specimen. Great form and rich color. The gentle rose posey is lovely too.

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  2. Hi Alison, The Mums are an amazing shade of orange. I don't know what it's called now, but, back in the 60's and 70's we called it burnt orange....they are a really nice shape, too.
    I'm in love with your roses and the pitcher is a beautiful color.
    I've been digging around in the flowerbeds, planting and transplanting, as well. How do come people walk out of a job like that with their hair in place and clean clothes???

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    1. Burnt orange is a good description. It's slightly darker on the insides of the petals.
      I often find twigs in my hair. There really is no hope, I try to look in a mirror before going shopping!

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  3. A fabulously warm shade of orange to bring inside to warm the cooler nights of autumn! The softer colors of your second arrangement bring to mind the gentler side of the season. Happy Monday!

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    1. So far the autumn has been gentle which is fine by me.

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  4. Real disarray here too, Alison!! What a gorgeous colour of chrysanthemum, definitely a burnt orange on my screen - having tried unsuccessfully to grow them I am not going to bother agin, except perhaps with the hardy ones. Good to see some roses appearing in vases still too - as you say, they soon lose their perfectness at this time of year.

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    1. I've grown them successfully before and most of the ones I'm growing are hardy, I'll keep trying a bit longer. This rose has produced the odd flower through the summer but now is covered. Who knows why?

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  5. Love your posy (I want that rose!) and C. 'Orange Allouise' is such a delicate shade of orange.
    When I bought my first house, the very NEXT day, in the RAIN, I was out planting things I had brought with me. The neighbors must have thought us nuts!

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    1. I do love the buds. It's great to plant in the rain,the plants love it and you don't need to water in! It's good to know I'm not alone in my madness.

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  6. I didn't wait to start planting when we moved in 6 years ago either - worse yet, I didn't even take "before" photos. That chrysanthemum is spectacular! I wish we could grow them - the garden centers here do sell the plants (usually only very ordinary specimens and always in full bloom) but they don't do well here with our unpredictable and often hot fall weather. Your second vase is wonderful too - I adore that rose and I use my own abelias as much for their colorful bracts as for their flowers too.

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    1. We are all the same it seems. I had pots and pots of plants I'd brought with me so I was keen to get them in the ground. I'd been collecting them over 6 months so they were as excited to be here as I was. I think they all survived but I still think of things I left behind.

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  7. Oh 'Alllouise is most attractive Alison. I acquired her some time ago as part of a chrysanthemum cuttings collection from Sarah Raven but I think that she has since departed to that compost heap in the sky :( Your description of plants mouldering in a bucket or wheelbarrow bought a smile to my face. Guilty here too m'lud

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    1. Yes I got my cuttings from Sarah Raven, I hope they'll last a few years but who knows. I've got a bucket full of plants now which I look at every weekend and say - 'I'll plant you today'.

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  8. I'm in the same climate as Kris and chrysanthemums are a disaster indeed, so I really enjoy seeing your beauties.

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    1. That's a shame but you can grow plenty of other things which I can't. That won't stop us wanting what the other has though. :)

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  9. Beautiful Chrysanthemum!
    Chrysanthemum are my flowers! I was born in the autumn!

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    1. I'm sure you love them then. I've just looked up mine. Sweet pea!

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  10. Your Chrysanths are a lovely colour Alison, and I love those beautiful curly petals. I made lots of mistakes with my garden even after waiting over twelve months before I started work on it, as it takes a while to get to know the soil and where the dry spots are. ;-)

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    1. You must be very patient. Luckily my soil is lovely but we are very windy so trying to grow some windbreaks which obviously takes time. The problem is most often that I have planted things too close together forgetting how they grow.

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  11. Both your arrangements are delightful. Nice to see that the buds I saw in your garden a week or so ago have opened to such beautiful blooms. Chrysanths can become additive..and they are a really worthwhile end of year plant to cultivate. I am sure that you will find the right guidance in one of those lovely gardening books which nearly over populate your bookshelves!!!! I can see a large bed next year from cuttings from an overwintered stool in your poly-tunnel.

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    1. Thanks and yes I will look them up. I say no more books but then...
      I certainly plant to over winter and take cuttings.

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  12. Both your arrangements are delightful. Nice to see that the buds I saw in your garden a week or so ago have opened to such beautiful blooms. Chrysanths can become additive..and they are a really worthwhile end of year plant to cultivate. I am sure that you will find the right guidance in one of those lovely gardening books which nearly over populate your bookshelves!!!! I can see a large bed next year from cuttings from an overwintered stool in your poly-tunnel.

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